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Trees spring from tiny seedling only two hands tall. From such small beginnings, great trees can develop. Consider the Yaku sugi which may attain a diameter of forty feet and an age of five thousand years. The pith may still be there, although oft it has rotted away. Should the center still remain, it still has the same diameter and height that it had in the beginning of its life. It experiences an existence unknown in the animal world.
Philosophy Thetree 1a Trees spring from tiny seedling only two hands tall. From such small beginnings, great trees can develop. Consider the Yaku sugi which may attain a diameter of forty feet and an age of five thousand years. The pith may still be there, although oft it has rotted away. Should the center still remain, it still has the same diameter and height that it had in the beginning of its life. It experiences an existence unknown in the animal world.
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The seedling of this ancient tree germinated many millennia ago during the age of the Vedic spiritual poets. This seemingly then started the process of life and growth which continues to this day. It is hard to perceive the destiny of the genes in this small bit of life. There must have been some relationship with a greater spirit.

The pith could easily have been reduced to dust during this long period of life, since the core of a tree, botanically dead, has a tendency to deteriorate. But that tree lives on, producing an infinity of new cells year after year.
Philosophy Thetree 1b The seedling of this ancient tree germinated many millennia ago during the age of the Vedic spiritual poets. This seemingly then started the process of life and growth which continues to this day. It is hard to perceive the destiny of the genes in this small bit of life. There must have been some relationship with a greater spirit.
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The pith could easily have been reduced to dust during this long period of life, since the core of a tree, botanically dead, has a tendency to deteriorate. But that tree lives on, producing an infinity of new cells year after year.
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The cambium layer houses the tree's living tissue. Each cell carries on its task of transporting vital fluids until new growth takes over its duties. The cell passes into the core, the heartwood. The staggering total of fluids rising and falling in the trees around the world constitutes a veritable Niagara.

The roots of a tree, too, have vital functions to perform. They anchor the tree. They search for water, without which the tree cannot survive. In dry areas, roots range far and wide, hunting water. Many hardy trees like the oak have a main root, called a taproot, which plunges deep into the earth. Others like the beeches and willows have instead many smaller roots which reach in all directions, fairly close to the surface.
Philosophy Thetree 1c The cambium layer houses the tree's living tissue. Each cell carries on its task of transporting vital fluids until new growth takes over its duties. The cell passes into the core, the heartwood. The staggering total of fluids rising and falling in the trees around the world constitutes a veritable Niagara.
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The roots of a tree, too, have vital functions to perform. They anchor the tree. They search for water, without which the tree cannot survive. In dry areas, roots range far and wide, hunting water. Many hardy trees like the oak have a main root, called a taproot, which plunges deep into the earth. Others like the beeches and willows have instead many smaller roots which reach in all directions, fairly close to the surface.
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In the leaves of a tree, that marvel called photosynthesis takes place. Water and minerals from the soil, carbon dioxide from the air and light from the sun combine in mysterious ways to produce the very substance of a tree's life. Without this miraculous process there would be no flora, no fauna, no man.

In each growing season in temperate zones, a tree adds on a layer of wood—a growth ring. The record of all that the average tree has witnessed and endured is written in its growth rings. They tell by their number how old the tree is. They help to pinpoint when droughts, floods, fire and insects ravaged the land and when life-giving rain fell in abundance. During difficult growth periods, the rings of some trees are so narrow and close together that it is almost impossible to count them.
Philosophy Thetree 1d In the leaves of a tree, that marvel called photosynthesis takes place. Water and minerals from the soil, carbon dioxide from the air and light from the sun combine in mysterious ways to produce the very substance of a tree's life. Without this miraculous process there would be no flora, no fauna, no man.
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In each growing season in temperate zones, a tree adds on a layer of wood—a growth ring. The record of all that the average tree has witnessed and endured is written in its growth rings. They tell by their number how old the tree is. They help to pinpoint when droughts, floods, fire and insects ravaged the land and when life-giving rain fell in abundance. During difficult growth periods, the rings of some trees are so narrow and close together that it is almost impossible to count them.
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We are left in awe by the nobility of a tree, its eternal patience, its suffering caused by man and sometimes nature, its witness to thousands of years of earth's history, its creations of fabulous beauty. It does nothing but good, with its prodigious ability to serve, it gives off its bounty of oxygen while absorbing gases harmful to other living things. The tree and its pith live on. Its fruits feed us. Its branches shade and protect us. And, finally, when time and weather bring it down, its body offers timber for our houses and boards for our furniture. The tree lives on.
Philosophy Thetree 1e We are left in awe by the nobility of a tree, its eternal patience, its suffering caused by man and sometimes nature, its witness to thousands of years of earth's history, its creations of fabulous beauty. It does nothing but good, with its prodigious ability to serve, it gives off its bounty of oxygen while absorbing gases harmful to other living things. The tree and its pith live on. Its fruits feed us. Its branches shade and protect us. And, finally, when time and weather bring it down, its body offers timber for our houses and boards for our furniture. The tree lives on.
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The cross section of a tree shows how much trees develop around the pith. Each concentric layer of wood indicates a year's growth i temperate climates. Trees of the tropics don't always have such annual rings, but where they do appear they represent extreme contrasts between wet and dry.

A. Outer Bark—The protective skin of a tree. The way bark expands characterizes the species of the tree: some scale off, some create fissures, and some seem almost elastic in their smoothness.

B. Phloem—The sugars produced by the leaves are conducted to the roots and the trunk through this layer.

C. Cambium Layer—Produces new wood and bark by the creation of cells.
Philosophy Thetree 2a The cross section of a tree shows how much trees develop around the pith. Each concentric layer of wood indicates a year's growth i temperate climates. Trees of the tropics don't always have such annual rings, but where they do appear they represent extreme contrasts between wet and dry.
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A. Outer Bark—The protective skin of a tree. The way bark expands characterizes the species of the tree: some scale off, some create fissures, and some seem almost elastic in their smoothness.
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B. Phloem—The sugars produced by the leaves are conducted to the roots and the trunk through this layer.
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C. Cambium Layer—Produces new wood and bark by the creation of cells.
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D. Xylem (Sapwood)—Through this layer moisture runs from the roots to the leaves and evaporates. This is the tree's "living" tissue. The sapwood is almost always lighter in color than the heartwood, producing delightful contrasts, but it is typically regarded as undesirable for fine wood-working. It is usually softer than the heartwood.

E. Heartwood—The bulk of the tree, composed of cells no longer carrying vital juices—essentially dead. In some instances, the heartwood decays, leaving the tree a living shell.

F. Early Growth—Fast growth of the tree in its youth. This heartwood is often knotty and therefore inferior.

G. Pith—Where it all started.
Philosophy Thetree 2b D. Xylem (Sapwood)—Through this layer moisture runs from the roots to the leaves and evaporates. This is the tree's "living" tissue. The sapwood is almost always lighter in color than the heartwood, producing delightful contrasts, but it is typically regarded as undesirable for fine wood-working. It is usually softer than the heartwood.
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E. Heartwood—The bulk of the tree, composed of cells no longer carrying vital juices—essentially dead. In some instances, the heartwood decays, leaving the tree a living shell.
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F. Early Growth—Fast growth of the tree in its youth. This heartwood is often knotty and therefore inferior.
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G. Pith—Where it all started.